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Syria: Concerns raised and possible next steps Syria: Concerns raised and possible next steps
by Rene Wadlow
2019-03-15 10:30:00
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March 15 is widely used as the date on which the conflict in Syria began. 15 March 2011 was the first “Day of Rage” held in a good number of localities to mark opposition to the repression of youth in the southern city of Daraa, where a month earlier young people had painted anti-government graphites on some of the walls, followed by massive arrests.

I think that it is important for us to look at why organizations that promote nonviolent action and conflict resolution in the US and Western Europe were not able to do more to aid those in Syria who tried to use nonviolence during the first months of 2011.  By June 2011, the conflict had largely become one of armed groups against the government forces, but there were at least four months when there were nonviolent efforts before many started to think that a military “solution” was the only way forward.  There were some parts of the country where nonviolent actions continued for a longer period.

syri01_400There had been early on an effort on the part of some Syrians to develop support among nonviolent and conflict resolution groups. As one Syrian activist wrote concerning the 'Left' in the US and Europe but would  also be true for nonviolent activists “I am afraid that it is too late for the leftists in the West to express  any solidarity with the Syrians in their extremely hard struggle. What I always found astonishing in this regard is that mainstream Western leftists know almost nothing about Syria, its society, its regime, its people, its political economy, its contemporary history.  Rarely have I found a useful piece of information or a genuinely creative idea in their analyses “(1)

In December 2011, there was the start of a short-lived Observer Mission of the League of Arab States.  In a 9 February 2012 message to the Secretary General of the League  of Arab States, Ambassador Nabil el-Araby, the Association of World Citizens (AWC) proposed a renewal of the Arab League Observer Mission with the inclusion of a greater number of non-governmental organization observers and a broadened mandate to go beyond fact-finding and thus to play an active conflict resolution role at the local level in the hope to halt the downward spiral of violence and killing.  In response, members from two Arab human rights non-governmental organizations were added for the first time.  However opposition to the conditions of the Arab League Observers from Saudi Arabia let to the end of the Observer Mission.

On many occasions since, the AWC has indicated to the United Nations, the Government of Syria and opposition movement the potentially important role of non-governmental organizations, both Syrian and international, in facilitating armed conflict resolution measures.

In these years of war, the Association of World Citizens, along with others, has highlighted six concerns:

1) The wide-spread violation of humanitarian law (international law in time of war) and thus the need for a U.N.-led conference for the re-affirmation of humanitarian law.

2) The  wide-spread violations of human rights standards.

3) The deliberate destruction of monuments and sites on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

4) The  use of chemical weapons in violation of the 1925 Geneva Protocol signed by Syria at the time, as well as in violation of the more recent treaty banning chemical weapons.

5)  The situation of the large number of persons displaced within the country as well as the large number of refugees and their conditions in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan. In addition there is the dramatic fate of those trying to reach Europe.

6)  The specific conditions of the Kurds and the possibility of the creation of a trans-frontier Kurdistan without dividing the current States of Syria, Iraq, Turkey and Iran.

These issues have been raised with diplomats and others participating in negotiations in Geneva as well as with the U.N. appointed mediators.  In addition, there have been articles published and then distributed to NGOs and others of potential influence.

The Syrian situation has grown increasingly complex since 2011 with more death and destruction as well as more actors involved and with a larger number of refugees and displaced persons. Efforts have been made to create an atmosphere in which negotiations in good faith could be carried out.  Good faith is, alas, in short supply. Efforts must continue. An anniversary is a reminder of the long road still ahead.

 *************************

Notes: Yassin al-Haj Saleh in Robin Yassin-Kassal and Leila Al- Shami. Burning Country. Syrians in Revolution and War (London: Pluto Press, 2015, p. 210)

 *************************

Rene Wadlow, President, Association of World Citizens


    
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