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Eureka: Reminders on American politics Eureka: Reminders on American politics
by Akli Hadid
2017-03-05 10:38:46
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amerpol01_400US politics differ significantly from what you have in Europe, Asia, Latin America or Africa. One thing people tend to forget is that American politics are largely decentralized and that most people look to their town, then their city, then their district, then their state then to the federal government in that order, meaning that the federal government rarely peddles with the average American’s lives. This is how American politics play out:

-The US government overseas federal projects and federal taxes that are mainly spent on defense, foreign affairs and a few other projects that are not held by individual states but by the government.

-The average American tends to look at his office or business politics with way more interest than public politics. Some families and businesses have constitutions or rules and are run like political machines when it comes to decision making. Many Americans view federal or local politics as “none of their business.” Regarding their family, business or office, they can spend hours discussing every detail of their office or family, and with great clarity.  

-The POTUS or President mainly overseas defense and foreign affairs issues and issues executive orders only when there are very pressing issues at the national level: poverty, racism, discrimination or other issues that are considered broadly national issues.

-Many American Christians believe that God loves rich people, especially those who worked hard to earn their fortunes, especially those who are rich enough to build their own towers and to own estates large enough to be a city.

-The first thing Americans tend to do when they suddenly earn a large sum of money tends to be buying property, sometimes mansions or large estates. Showing off your real estate makes you look good in the US, and is better than any speech you might deliver.

-Intelligence, knowledge of trivia facts or great oratory skills were never really admired in the American social tradition and tend to be viewed merely as a fact of life. Many American scholars tend to keep things simple and tend to be humble, unlike some European countries where knowledge of trivia and oratory skills tend to be shown off and even a bit exaggerated.

-There’s no stigma in the US against inaccuracies or lack of speech clarity. There is a stigma against lack of charisma and refusing to answer questions by the press.

-Let’s just say, and I’ll be provocative here, that the POTUS has more influence over European and world politics than over American politics. This is because Europe and the rest of the world tend to have very centralized governments, and that US decisions tend to affect central governments in Europe more than they would affect politics say, in California.

Hope this clarifies some of the confusion over US politics.


     
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Emanuel Paparella2017-03-06 10:13:50
The other side of the coin: Perhaps the American Christians that believe that God loves the rich and rejects the poor, are not Christians at all...just Puritans turned into greedy capitalists who cover up their intellectual poverty with what they have in the bank. That may explain in anti-intellectualism and the so called "humility" when it comes to things of the intellect. Food for thought.


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