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Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
by The Ovi Team
2017-12-29 08:55:03
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December 29th and on this day in 1916, James Joyce's book Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is published in New York. The book had been previously serialized in Ezra Pound's review The Egoist.

portr01_400James Joyce was born in Dublin, the eldest of 10 children of a cheerful ne'er-do-well who eventually went bankrupt. Joyce attended Catholic school and University College in Dublin, where he learned Dano-Norwegian so he could read the plays of Henrik Ibsen in the original. In college, he began a lifetime of literary rebellion, self-publishing an essay rejected by the school's literary magazine adviser.

After graduation, Joyce moved to Paris. He resolved to study medicine to support himself while writing but soon gave it up. He returned to Dublin to visit his mother's deathbed and remained to teach school and work odd jobs. On June 16, 1904, he met Nora, whom he convinced to return to Europe with him. The couple settled in Trieste, where they had two children, and then in Zurich. Joyce struggled with serious eye problems, undergoing 25 operations for various troubles between 1917 and 1930.

In 1914, he published The Dubliners, and his 1915 novel, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, brought him fame and the patronage of several wealthy people, including Edith Rockefeller.

In 1918, his revolutionary stream of consciousness novel Ulysses began to be serialized in the American journal Little Review. However, the U.S. Post Office stopped the publication's distribution in December of that year on the grounds that the novel was obscene. Sylvia Beach, owner of bookstore Shakespeare and Co. in Paris, where Joyce moved in 1920, published the novel herself in 1922, but it was banned in the United Kingdom and the United States until 1933.

 


    
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Emanuel Paparella2013-12-29 15:07:30
Indeed, Puritanism dies hard in America and Jansenism in Ireland. Italy was more hospitable to Joyce and inspired through one of its geniuses, a fact not well known, the philosophy of Giambattista Vico which is unmistakable in Joyce's Finnegan's Wake.


Abigail George2014-12-30 12:40:03
I think now I will be inspired to read Finnegan's Wake after I finish Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Reading Ovi is demanding but I am forever learning something new, being more inspired. I was inspired to read the letters between Gandhi and Tolstoy too. The Confession is very difficult for me to read. I thought Letters to a Young Poet by Rilke was difficult, I thought deep philosophical questions and existential phenomenology was difficult but I can only manage a few pages of Tolstoy. I cannot believe the life of privilege that he was born into. To me I am just trying to keep up with it all but I am having a wonderful time being inspired.


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